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Sat Sep 09, 2017 8:12 am

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Eric, In looking over your CB pin retention system, I have a question. Is your drain plug kit 1/2" or 3/4"? It appears from the diagram that you have sourced a 3/4" drain plug to allow sufficient room for the 1/2" CB bolt to easily slip inside. Love the idea, just trying to understand the sizing.

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Brent Butikofer

Scamp: Hagoth
https://buildinghagoth.wordpress.com

Scamp: Shackleton
https://buildingshackelton.wordpress.com

Skiff America 20: Northern Cross
https://hamnegger.wordpress.com

Never Stop Learning or Exploring



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Sun Sep 10, 2017 9:38 pm

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Hi Marty - thanks!



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Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:10 pm

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Hi Brent,

Yes, it's just like the 1/2" drain plug (544494 from West Marine) that's specified in the build manual:

https://www.westmarine.com/buy/west-mar ... 81_003_505

I used this one instead - the only difference I think is that it's bronze instead of brass:

http://www.clcboats.com/shop/products/b ... -plug.html

They are both "1/2 inch" NPT tapered pipe thread. I think the 1/2" refers to the inside diameter of a pipe that could theoretically be threaded into the threads of that size. The actual opening is around .75" which is just big enough for the bushing to fit through (the tip of the bushing sticks inside the end of the drain on mine - not that it's necessary). I had some method for getting everything lined up, but can't remember off hand exactly what the steps were : |

Here are some more pics:

Here you can see the threads, then the first bushing, the centerboard trunk gap (which looks really foreshortened here), the second bushing, and the back end - epoxy (with a s.s. washer under there). The wood doubler/disk that the drain sits in is 9mm kit scrap glued to the centerboard doubler.

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Pin dimensions (1/4" bolt screwed/glued into a 1/2" diameter s.s. rod)

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Here is the pin with the end of the bolt pushed as far up as possible into the hole drilled into the drain plug (the hole happens to be about as long as the 1/4" bolt that extends from the pin:

Attachment:
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Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:49 pm

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Here is the hole drilled a bit bigger than the bolt:

Attachment:
IMG_3888.JPG
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I think I am starting to remember my steps...

1. englarged holes in centerboard case to accept bushings
2. temporarily inserted a dowel with pilot hole drilled in center for a forstner bit to follow (I think I drilled maybe an 1/8" into the port side centerboard case doubler with a drill bit the O.D. of the drain, because the drain was a bit longer than the 9mm disk it sits in -- could have just used a thicker wood disk)
3. drilled out the hole in the wood disk for the drain
4. eyeball-centered the disk hole over the centerboard case hole and drilled the 3 screw holes through the disk and into the doubler
5. dry fit
6. glued it all up at once - bushings, disk, drain and screws (did the cap on the other end later)
7. then figured the dimensions for the pin/bolt - the pin slides side to side maybe an eight of an inch when he plug is tightened down tight - the 1/4" bolt is just a touch longer than the hole drilled into the drain plug
8. hoped it works...



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Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:34 am

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Eric, I love this design for several reasons:

1-Rudendency with the drain plug fitting
2-Hold very little water within the mechanism
3-Traps no water against a wooden part
4-Simple yet effective way to extract the bolt if needed

Now for a few more questions:

1-How did you secure and flare the T handle you inserted through the bolt head?
2-What did you coat the T handle with (looks awesome)?
3-Is there a benefit to using bronze over brass?

Excellent work here

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Brent Butikofer

Scamp: Hagoth
https://buildinghagoth.wordpress.com

Scamp: Shackleton
https://buildingshackelton.wordpress.com

Skiff America 20: Northern Cross
https://hamnegger.wordpress.com

Never Stop Learning or Exploring



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Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:00 am

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Hey Brent,

Sure. I cut some thin s.s. rod (maybe 3/32 or 1/8"?). I torched one end with a little propane torch and hammered a flat spot on the end. Then drilled a similar sized hole in the top part of the drain plug, inserted the rod, heated the other end of the rod and hammered that too. It doesn't take much to flatten out the rod enough to keep it from coming out if the hole itself is the same diameter. Finished off by dipping the ends a couple of times in "PlastiDip". I love PlastiDip.

I guess I just liked the idea of bronze -- I don't think I had a good reason.



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Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:46 pm

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I wanted the oarlocks to have good contact with the coaming rails, but also wanted the rails to have a nice round-over. This was my solution and was pretty easy.

Once the spot was located, the oarlocks were dry fitted. Then I put packaging tape on the back of the oarlocks, smushed thickened epoxy on the backs and screwed the oarlocks back on.

after the epoxy set, the oarlocks were popped off and the sharp epoxy edges softened up.

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And...I finally turned the boat over yesterday! I could have (maybe should have) asked people to come over to help, but I did it by myself, and it was fine. Once suspended, I did all the turning standing next to SCAMP around the middle of its length on the centerboard/starboard side. That allowed me to grip the centerboard slot under the boat to get things started. I did tiny lifts, and checked things after each incremental move. When I couldn't pull up any further (nothing to grab onto) I tied a rope to the port side bulkhead hole under the coaming/deck (meant for capsize re-entry stirrup attachment) and fed that under the boat to the starboard side. That way I could pull on the rope from below and push on the hull above to keep it turning until I could get a hold of the port side gunwales and pull up on those to finish it off.

Attachment:
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Sat Sep 16, 2017 3:38 am

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Your build looks great!

Marty



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