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Tue Mar 13, 2018 11:43 am

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Location: Arnstein, Germany, exactly 50N 10E

Hi Scampers,

I'm Martin from Germany. I' ve really done it- I just bought my set of plans and here the journey begins....

Are there any central European builders -even Germans or Austrians- here? I once saw a Scamp community's map somewhere... but i can't find it at the moment. So if there is anybody living not too far away, i'd be glad to hear from you!

all the best,
Martin



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Tue Mar 13, 2018 7:09 pm

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Please post pictures and progress! There is a SCAMP registry map. It's a hyperlink on the SCAMP page of the boat plans and kits section of the SCA website. There are SCAMPs being built and already built in Germany. I bet someone will chime in soon. Welcome!



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Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:59 pm

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Location: Arnstein, Germany, exactly 50N 10E

Friends with SCAMPS wrote:
Please post pictures and progress!


Hi,
well, this will take a lot of time- years maybe. But if I do it, of course i'll share it.

One question: the seat benches are pretty low (10"/25cm). I've seen that some add a footwell, but I dislike having a uneven floor with a hole I hardly can keep dry and clean. I considered having a "slatted frame" as a 2"- on-top- seating bench which I can use to create a big bed when laying it on 3 or 4 strings i attatch inbetween the seats for that reason. What do you think?

best,
Martin


Last edited by bei.beckers on Fri Mar 16, 2018 2:10 am, edited 1 time in total.


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Wed Mar 14, 2018 8:27 am

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That would raise your center of gravity, for sure. I think you can search this forum by keyword and see what others are doing. I am 5'8" and didn't feel cramped sittting in a SCAMP, but, I do have more torso than legs, and I wasn't on an extended cruise.



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Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:29 pm

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In sailing the SCAMP I've never felt the footwell was excessively shallow ... plus when sailing usually legs feel great, as the boat is wide for her length, as bracing self with feet on edge of leeward seat.

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Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:52 pm

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Martin, Glad to hear you're building a Scamp. With regard to your sleeping/footwell/benchtop issue, I've written extensively about one way to solve this issue on my blog. You can check it out here:

https://buildinghagoth.wordpress.com/20 ... rate-idea/

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Brent Butikofer

Scamp: Hagoth
https://buildinghagoth.wordpress.com

Scamp: Shackleton
https://buildingshackelton.wordpress.com

Skiff America 20: Northern Cross
https://hamnegger.wordpress.com

Never Stop Learning or Exploring



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Fri Mar 16, 2018 2:28 am

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Location: Arnstein, Germany, exactly 50N 10E

Hi Brent,

quite a cool blog- and an well considered solution as well. Did you make some experiance sailing with it? My reservations with the footwell (and especially when the table and other stuff is laying down there...) is that i may collect lots of dirt there especially when sailing along areas without a habour every 2 miles.

Did you try capsizing with the footwell? Can you rise it alone? The footwell will catch lots of water.



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Sun Mar 18, 2018 3:04 pm

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Martin, the footwell is very well established within the Scamp community of builders, in fact the new MarkII kit includes a footwell. Howard Rice was the first sailer to install the footwell to my knowledge. In my opinion, the footwell offers multiple advantages over the previous version of Scamp. Shackleton was originally built without the footwell. After seeing how well it performed during a Scamp Skills Academy, I installed a footwell into Shackleton. Having sailed Shackleton before and after the installation, I vowed to never be without the footwell.

The advantages include:
1-lowering the center of gravity by allowing a sailor to stand in this area when sailing.
2-lowering the center of gravity when righting the boat after capsize, by collecting all water into one location (in the widest section of the boat) and by placing the weight of this water below the water line.
3-easier to bail unwanted water out of the boat as it all collects into one place
4-increase comfort by increasing leg extension
5-allows you to sweep sand and grit (the enemy of all sailboats) off the floor and into the footwell, keeping the cockpit sole cleaner
6-creates a place to throw wet or muddy shoes which can be covered over by filler boards or a grate.
7-creates more seating options by sitting on the cockpit sole, placing your feet into the footwell at anchorage or during a lunch break

The advantages are multiple, but there are a few things that should be considered. A smaller footwell is safer than a larger footwell. A small footwell keep water ingress to a minimum during a capsize, minimizing the destabilizing effect of free flowing water.

Finally, Howard has tested the footwell system extensively. I will let him speak for himself regarding the pros and cons. He is much more experienced than myself.

I love mine and would not be without one.

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Brent Butikofer

Scamp: Hagoth
https://buildinghagoth.wordpress.com

Scamp: Shackleton
https://buildingshackelton.wordpress.com

Skiff America 20: Northern Cross
https://hamnegger.wordpress.com

Never Stop Learning or Exploring



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Sun Mar 18, 2018 10:13 pm

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Location: Arnstein, Germany, exactly 50N 10E

Hi Brent,

wow, that sounds really convincing. But i originally thought, Scamp was self- bailing. I've seen so many pictures of Scamps with drainholes (sorry for my funny wording, but school English is definitly overcharged for "naval use"- as nearly all dictionaries are :? ) in the transom. I was convinced this holes should lead out all water afer a wave overcame or capsize happened.

When I got you right, you don't need those holes, you collect all the water inside the footwell. Well, I can bail it out manually, but the footwell can't catch all the water of a capsize. Or can it really? Or do you have the transom holes in addition?

Another thing: the footwell has it's "own" bottom or is it the boats real bottom? In 2nd. case the floor wasn't on level, which is good to collect water, but somehow strange to stay or rest your feet there.

By the way: I've seen one footwell with an Anderson- type- selfbailer. But that's below waterline, right. Isn't tha a kind of risky?

Sorry for so many questions (and i haven't started yet...).

Best, Martin



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Mon Mar 19, 2018 7:17 am

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Hi Martin,

You have very good questions and I contemplated those same questions myself as I built my SCAMP. I will share my options for you here, and note that they are humble opinions from a SCAMP builder who is not yet a SCAMP sailor ( I will launch my SCAMP this spring).

- I would not call the SCAMP cockpit “self bailing”, at least not in the way that I built my SCAMP. There are two drainplugs through the stern but those are below the waterline and should not be left open when underway. If the SCAMP takes on a boarding wave and water enters the cockpit, those drainplugs in the stern cannot be opened to let the water out while the boat is still in the water. By comparison, my Compac 16 has cockpit drains/scuppers that exit the stern above the waterline and below the level of the cockpit floor, so those will bail out the Compac 16 cockpit. That said the SCAMP is made out of wood and also has so many sealed flotation compartments, that even if you filled up the cockpit, the hull would still be floating, whereas the Compac 16 will sink if it takes on too much water. One could attempt to install Venturi bailers in the bottom of the hull of the scamp which if successful could make the SCAMP a true self bailer. I did not opt to install Venturi bailers in my SCAMP as I was not yet convinced they would work. I am very open to installing them if I can learn a good mounting location and model that will work. My plan is to manually bail out any water that gets into the boat with a bucket and a manual bulge pump. Those who have capsized the SCAMP have reported that after being righted, the boat does not take on much water anyway. There are YouTube videos showing this. I like the drain plugs in the stern, and I will use them to drain out the boat when it is on the trailer. I will be able to open those drains and hose out the boat and the water will drain out. I do not want to have to bail out the boat after washing it, and those drain plugs will come in very handy.

- Footwell: I decided to build a footwell in order to increase my comfort when sitting in the boat. The footwell will give space for sailors to extend their legs. Additionally it will provide a place to stand up straight while sailing, while keeping your center of gravity a bit lower. I doubled up the thickness of the floor of the footwell, filleted it, and fiberglassed it. A cross section drawing of my footwell can be found on my website and on this forum. I think that you are correct that if the boat takes on water, it will go into the footwell, but the water weight will be low in the boat and if anything will serve as a bit of ballast until it is bailed out. Others could advise from experience, but I don’t think that the footwell reduces the seaworthiness of the boat. If it fills up with some water you could always keep your feet on the higher sole plate until you bail out the footwell. I plan to bail water out the footwell with a manual bilge pump. I also plan on having capsize events or boarding waves be rare events so I think based on how I plan to sail the boat, I will be able to keep the footwell fairly dry most times. As with the drainplugs in the stern, I added a drain plug in the bottom of my footwell so that with the boat on the trailer , I can open the drain plug and let water drain from the footwell. This will be handy when rinsing and washing the boat.

Food for thought!

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-Jason

SCAMP#349 "Argo" build in-process
Build log at http://www.argobuilder.com
Currently Sailing 1981 Compac 16



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