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Fri Mar 20, 2015 6:46 am

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Fellow Sailors,

The plans show 'backing under cabin top' for mounting rigging hardware near the underside aft edge of the cabin top.

Question is: How thick of backer piece are you all using here?

I don't have the hardware in hand and could use some advise on how thick the backer piece should be to properly accept the hardware.

Brent

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Fri Mar 20, 2015 9:41 am

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Brent -

I used a piece of 9mm ply for this, one on each side. Maybe about 4 or5" x 7" or so. I was going to put another 'how I screwed up' post on my blog to document that, but didn't do that one.

The problem was that I thought I would be able to make the wood conform to the curve of the cabin roof just by clamping it securely. So I installed the first one, and got it firmly epoxied in, but it turns out the cabin roof did part of the conforming (the roof curve got distorted).

So I cut/chiseled/sanded it out and started over. This time I ran a number of saw kerfs in the backing plates so they would bend much easier and things went swimmingly. I cut the kerfs maybe 5/8" or 3/4" apart, and halfway through the ply or so. A fillet around the backing plates hides the ends of the kerfs. The plates show some slight facets due to this, but the cabin roof is undistorted.

I didn't have concrete guidance on exactly where the plates would need to be located, to I put them in the corner against B4, and abutting the cabin roof cleats that run forward past the mast box.

Easy to install, fillet, sand, and paint while the boat is upside down.

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Fri Mar 20, 2015 10:23 am

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Also, I expect to install smaller plywood blocks on top of the cabin roof. They will be contoured to fit the cabin roof curve on the bottom, and provide flat spots to mount the halyard cleat (right side) and downhaul camcleat (port side).

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Building blog: http://woodnmetalguy.blogspot.com



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Fri Mar 20, 2015 10:38 am

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Dave,

Thanks for the information. In looking closely at the radius at this location, it appears there is not much curve to the roof. My thought is to just use plenty of epoxy on the backer plate and let it (the epoxy) fit to the curve, cleaning up any squeeze out. Might this not work out OK?

Brent

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Scamp: Hagoth
https://buildinghagoth.wordpress.com

Scamp: Shackleton
https://buildingshackelton.wordpress.com

Skiff America 20: Northern Cross
https://hamnegger.wordpress.com

Never Stop Learning or Exploring



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Fri Mar 20, 2015 12:38 pm

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Brent - yes, I think that could work, too. The larger your backing plate, the bigger your gap would be, of course. If you know right where you want the hardware you could probably get by with a smaller plate. I didn't at the time, and so wanted a little wiggle room.

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Building blog: http://woodnmetalguy.blogspot.com



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Fri Mar 20, 2015 1:49 pm

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Hi All,
Has any scamp builder dropped the falls of the downhull and main halyard threw
The cabin roof. I was thinking they could come to a swivel jammer by the mast box.
This would keep the cabin roof clear .In this case the backing blocks would not be
needed.Just a thought,I am no where near this part of my build.
I've just taken the bulkheads and seat longitudes back apart ,after the dry fit.
Scamp 303' Richie UK.



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Fri Mar 20, 2015 2:10 pm

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Richie,

This is an excellent idea. I would also like to know if anyone has done this. Are there disadvantages we are not thinking of? Others please chime in here. All opinions are welcome and encouraged.

Brent

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Brent Butikofer

Scamp: Hagoth
https://buildinghagoth.wordpress.com

Scamp: Shackleton
https://buildingshackelton.wordpress.com

Skiff America 20: Northern Cross
https://hamnegger.wordpress.com

Never Stop Learning or Exploring



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Fri Mar 20, 2015 4:33 pm

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Brent - I just grabbed a photo of my backing blocks for your interest. The dustpan contains the first one! I measured and found they are 5" front to back and 9" wide. I used the bandsaw to cut the kerfs.

Image

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CLC Chesapeake 17LT, Chesapeake 14, Sassafras 12
Building blog: http://woodnmetalguy.blogspot.com



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Fri Mar 20, 2015 4:39 pm

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Richie - I like your thinking! I like the idea from a clean roof perspective, and it would make it easy to stow the extra line under the veranda area without having to route it out over the edge of the roof.

However, I would guess it would make the actual adjusting of the halyard and downhaul more difficult, and that may be an overriding consideration. If you were to come through the roof on either side of the mast you'd also be on the wrong (front) side of B3. But maybe coming down further aft would work.

Interesting idea at any rate.

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Sail #243
CLC Chesapeake 17LT, Chesapeake 14, Sassafras 12
Building blog: http://woodnmetalguy.blogspot.com



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Fri Mar 20, 2015 4:39 pm

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Richie,

Gig Harbor Boatworks does that—drops lines through cabintop by mast—on their glass boats. The idea has merit for sure and I love how you end up with a clean cabintop. I've only sailed the glass boat a couple of times, but it seems to work well.

If there's a tradeoff (isn't there always?) I think it's that the working end of the halyard and downhaul end up further away from the helm. It's a pretty good stretch from tiller to under veranda.

Best,
Josh

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