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Sun Apr 05, 2015 6:43 pm

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Location: Port Ludlow, Washington

Those 1/2" holes are indeed used for tie downs to the trailer. I have them lined with 1/2" fiberglass tube stock cut to fit and then epoxied in. If I had done the job properly, I would have done the "over-drill epoxy-fill" thing, then re-drilled to fit the tubes

No issues with bending down to tie/untie or with bumping my head. I cow-hitch the untied bundled line to the trailer frame before launching. If I can't bend over to do the deed, then maybe it will be time to quit sailing :(. If I have crew with me, the tie/untie is one of their duties ;)

The boat seems to be well tied-in using 1/4" non-stretch Piranha Dyneema.
In fact, I once launched in a hurry, having forgotten to remove the tie-downs. Noddy floated the trailer nicely, it wagged nicely on the trailer hitch, and all remained snug. A quick trip back up the ramp soon set things right again; luckily there were no spectators to rib me! :oops:

On a long freeway trip, I might consider a traditional padded around the hull tie-down strap as a "belt and suspenders" precaution but so far I've not felt the need. I do carry a strap in my tow vehicle.

As to turbulence issues, maybe I'll consider plugging them for competitive SCAMP racing events :lol:

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Voyaging with Noddy, #11



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Mon Apr 06, 2015 7:11 am

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Simeon, thanks for having the guts to admit that one! We've all made incredible errors, sailing and otherwise, but few want to post them on a well read forum. Would have been a great picture. U-tube videos shot at launch ramps are some of the most entertaining ever seen. At least for boaters. Thanks for the smiles. --Will



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Tue Apr 07, 2015 6:21 am

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Zephyr has those skeg tie down holes as well. Mine are 3/4 or 1". I wanted them to be big enough to properly get in there for resealing or re-painting. (No, I don't care about the negligible speed hit). It turns out that with the bigger hole I'm able to take a loop around the trailer bunk to hold Zephyr next to it. That allows me to drop the CB down onto the bunk so it isn't swinging for hundreds of miles. I've already replaced the CB uphaul, admittedly due to my not making a chafe-free tube through the forward end of the case.

It is so nice not to have to "belly band" the boat. I'll keep the chafe on the skegs, thank you.

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Tue Apr 07, 2015 8:28 am

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Simeon, I'm wondering if you have modified the GH trailer such that there is support for the CB, like a middle bunk of some sort. My GH trailer has no support in the middle and it looks like the CB could just fall to the ground were the uphaul line to fail. I'm thinking of adding a center bunk for that reason. One of the scamps at the rally last August had arrived to find that he'd been dragging his CB on the road for the last 50 miles or so. Talk about chafe! --Will



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Tue Apr 07, 2015 11:27 am

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Will, here's more stuff to ponder ;)

No mods to the GH trailer other than to build up the forward bunk so that the front of the boat rides higher when trailed. With the supplied single bunk (padded 2x4) the cockpit sole collected rainwater up against Bulkhead 3 when trailed. My bunk is now "3-bunks-high", an additional 4 inches, and collected cockpit water now drains aft to the sumps. Of course, the height of the towing vehicle's hitch is the determining factor; my Volvo 850 has a very low hitch ball, even with the highest rise one I could buy. The top of the ball is 29 inches above the road before any trailer tongue weight is applied.

I did move the "winch-support/bow pads" upright unit aft on the frame tongue about 2 inches to make things fit better. I also moved the winch-support unit about 3 inches higher to center the bow-eye on the pads.

If lowered, my CB rests on the trailer axle which is leaf-sprung so that's no good for trailering. Works well in the garage if I lower the CB for maintenance.

You might be able to put another padded bunk across just forward of where Bulkhead-6 falls but it would need to be secured under the trailer frame rather than over. This is because the rocker of the skegs causes them to end up below the top of the frame at that point.

When trailed, my setup has too much weight on the hitch so I am about to move the axle and fenders forward, probably about 9 inches. I can't move the boat any further forward because the skegs are right at the edge of the rollers. I'm estimating there is 160 pounds force on the hitch now. I suspect most small boat trailers have their axles factory set anticipating that the boat will be trailed with the weight of a motor on the transom.

FYI, I have the long tongue GH trailer; the boat's bow transom is about 7 foot aft of the hitch ball-socket. Total length of trailer is about 17 feet.

Simeon


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Tue Apr 07, 2015 1:27 pm

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Simeon, you say you have to pay attention to filling the ballast tank. I thought it was supposed to stop filling by itself and get topped off with a bailer. How much gear do you keep aboard?



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Tue Apr 07, 2015 3:44 pm

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Rob -

Earlier in this thread I was referring to filling the 20 gallon water ballast tank with a fresh water hose while the boat was on the trailer at the launch site.

If you launch the SCAMP with the tank plug removed and the deck plate on the cockpit sole open, then it takes about 4 or 5 minutes to fill I would guess. It automatically stops filling when it reaches the level of the boats current draft which depends on the load aboard and number of crew. It's usually about 2 or 3 inches below the cockpit sole. Then you reach down and insert and close the drain plug at the bottom of the tank. Using a bucket with water from over the side, you can then top it off with 3 to 5 gallons, a couple of buckets worth, and then close the deck plate.
It's important to rock the boat a bit to burp the tank so you end up with a solid block of water. No sloshing then and therefore no shifting ballast.

As far as associated gear, I've got a bucket, sponge, shammy, and home made wooden deck plate wrench.

Other gear that I carry aboard is far too numerous to list but of course includes fenders & dock lines, paddle/oars, and all the required/recommended Coast Guard safety equipment.

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Tue Apr 07, 2015 4:09 pm

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Thanks for clarifying that, Simeon. Of course I've seen that picture of Howard filling the tank with a bailer. I guess I forgot the bit about the hose… :-)



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