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Fri Jun 12, 2015 12:22 pm

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Serge,

I cannot see that the depth of the flange on the outside mount should make any difference. On the regular mount in the back sumps I do wonder about the slope (they are designed to sit flat) and the proximity to the skeg. Yours looks fairly close to the skeg but that may be just photographic effect. I think they need pretty good flow on both sides of the unit to create the needed suction. I will see once my boat hits the water. I already had my hole made when all the comments started about these not working so am with you in that if nothing else they will make a great drain on the trailer. I do also have a transom drain, a cross connector for the sumps and an electric bailer. Oh yeah, also a kayak hand bailer for back-up.

I have had these in multiple rowing shells and they work extremely well in those situations. They are outside mounts and the flange is not inset. They are flat and they probably sit less than a cm below the surface. It is easy to maintain a rowing shell at 6-7 knots and the bailers seem to start working at about 4 knots. In an open water boat the cockpit can completely fill with water in one good wave and the bailer completely drains it in less than 10 strokes. The cockpit is not very big in these boats but it would be bigger than your footwell. They all leak a little bit once you stop moving but is should not be much.

Looking forward to comparing paint jobs on the water if you are coming to the rally in PT.

Cheers,

Dan



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Sun Jun 14, 2015 12:25 am

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Thanks for the thoughts, both of you. I will let you know more details with more experimentation.
Dan, I plan to be at Scamp skills, the Palooza, and the Rally. Can't wait, My next gaol is to try and making some kind of tent by then, so it won't try and rain on us.

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Thu Jun 18, 2015 10:44 pm

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OK yesterday I was able to do some tests regarding the Venture Bailer at the bottom of my foot well. I have come to the conclusion it simply is too deep to work effectively. I had sufficient wind to heel the boat on a starbird tack bringing the bailer closer to the surface of the water, it seemed to work fine when 6 inches or less below the surface of the water. When on the port tack, it was deep enough that the back pressure would actually push the bailer closed on its own.
I figure that with the boat level the Baylor is just under a foot deep, with two people and ballast. This means for it work, I need to have at least 6 inches or more of water in my foot well, to counter the pressure. So I guess its not a total loss I can at least evacuate the footwell down to 6 inches of water :-) These conclusions were made by observations and not very scientificly conducted. A different Bailer and a different boat could give completely different results. But I hope this is helpful, for those who have made similar plans.

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You can burn the land or boil the sea but you can't take my Serenity.



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Wed Sep 16, 2015 2:09 am

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If I recall Sergeis bailer is a super mini. When this question came up in June I contacted a couple of bailer experts at ASP and both of them were stumped and attributed the bailer function issue in this case to the fact the bailer model chosen was too small for the volume of the footwell vs the depth of the mount location under water. This was also my guess. I am about to test with my smaller footwell and two Super Max (big boat bailers) models. Many sailors including me use venturi bailers. We'll see.



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Wed Sep 16, 2015 11:22 am

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From the Andersen page, the SuperMax is an inside mount. I have read that outside mount is preferable as the gaskets are easy to replace.

Is there a SuperMax outside mount of which I am unaware?

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Wed Sep 16, 2015 11:28 am

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Ref: inside/outside mount:

Quote:
Replacing an external gasket requires removing the unit from the inside of the boat, replacing an internal gasket requires taking the unit apart by drilling out the assembly rivets.


If this is incorrect and replacing the gasket on the Super inside-mount bailers is easy, then I will go ahead and try the SuperMax.

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Fri Sep 18, 2015 7:32 am

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I am installing SuperMax bailers in the footwell of my boat and while I can't yet comment on how well they will work I did want to comment on the internal versus external question. I am mounting the bailers internally, which allows for a close fit because of the thickness of the plywood bottom and easy installation with wood screws.

Replacing an internal gasket - the gasket inside the body of the bailer - requires the bailer's removal from the boat. Replacing a mounting gasket - the gasket that seals the bailer to the boat - depends on how the bailer is mounted to boat, whether internally or externally.

It seems to me that an internally mounted bailer is a good option for the SCAMP and I would not worry about the need to replace an internal gasket (the gasket inside the body of the bailer, not the gasket sealing the bailer to the inside of the boat) at some point in the future since the internal gasket only needs replacing when it wears out and starts to leak.

Hope is this on point and a little helpful.

David
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Fri Sep 18, 2015 8:47 am

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David,
Your bailers seem very easy to fit. I am fitting Anderson Super Maxi bailers, which are an internal fitting and require not only a cutout in the hull but a rebate on the inside face as the bailer is designed for a hull thickness of 7mm. and mine is 12mm. However they did come with countersunk machine screws and locknuts.
Paul



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Sun Sep 20, 2015 8:43 am

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scamp14 wrote:
David,
Your bailers seem very easy to fit. I am fitting Anderson Super Maxi bailers, which are an internal fitting and require not only a cutout in the hull but a rebate on the inside face as the bailer is designed for a hull thickness of 7mm. and mine is 12mm. However they did come with countersunk machine screws and locknuts.
Paul


Hi Paul,

The bailers I have also require a cutout, but a rebate (rabbet) may not be needed as my hull thickness is 9mm and the bailers measured out at 9mm. The bailers did come with countersunk machine screws and thick and thin gaskets. Rather than using the countersunk machine screws or the gaskets, however, I will be using wood screws and bedding compound to keep the bottom of the bailer flush with the bottom of the hull. Admittedly, a slight rebate may be needed because of fiberglass, epoxy and paint added to hull and inside the footwell. I cannot speak to whether this approach will actually succeed since I am still working on the boat.

David E
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Wed May 03, 2017 4:47 pm

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I prefer the inside mount as it leaves the bottom cleaner and less draggy, though on a Scamp, I don't think the drag concerns are all that much to worry about. I also like the clean exterior look. Of course a recess for the plate is necessary, but a pretty simple thing with a router and a template. Bedded or in many cases, simply bonded in place, neat, clean, no leaks, etc.

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