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Tue Oct 19, 2010 2:55 am

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Why the blunt bow on the Scamp? Seems as though it may slow the boat when fighting against oncoming waves.

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Tue Oct 19, 2010 7:53 am

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Hi Jesse,

I can't explain it like a Naval Architect, but a pram bow means the boat has more useable volume for its length—making SCAMP much "bigger" than her almost 12 feet. As for facing waves and chop, the pram bow is fuller and more buoyant than a pointed bow so will rise to meet and go over seas, as opposed to "through" them. I'll be surprised if the flat pram section on SCAMP spends much time in the water.

For general evidence of their viability, look no further than the Optimist, El Toro, San Francisco Pelican and Great Pelican, and Mirror Dinghy—not to mention a few thousand years of Chinese boats ;-)

I'm sure that like everything else in boat design there are trade-offs, perhaps the surface area of the pram bow could slow the boat if she hits a wave up high, but I don't see any significant disadvantage for our purposes.

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Fri Oct 29, 2010 3:04 pm

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A pram bow offers more volume forward for a given length. This volume provides the boat with the means to carry more load and simultaneously keep the pram bow up out of the water. Over the last twenty years or so I have had the pleasure of cruising thousands of miles (both blue water and protected waters) aboard a series of sleep aboard Mirror Dinghies (smaller than Scamp) and cannot recall ever having an issue with the pram bow. Many of these cruises by necessity included going in and out through breaking surf and the pram bow of the Mirror was always high and dry because I loaded the boat to ensure it was.

Although an ancient classic form the pram bow may be an acquired taste. Aesthetically I like it because it works so well. This is one of those classic form/function questions. The form is beautiful because it offers such great function when applied to the micro mini cruiser genre.

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PocketYacht



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Thu Jun 21, 2012 9:17 am

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I love the looks .... inspiration for me to try and build one like this.....


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Thu Jun 21, 2012 9:04 pm

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pocketyacht wrote:
...... Over the last twenty years or so I have had the pleasure of cruising thousands of miles (both blue water and protected waters) aboard a series of sleep aboard Mirror Dinghies (smaller than Scamp) and cannot recall ever having an issue with the pram bow. Many of these cruises by necessity included going in and out through breaking surf and the pram bow of the Mirror was always high and dry because I loaded the boat to ensure it was......



I'd love to read some of those stories, any chance of seeing them in print?

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Sat Jun 23, 2012 5:48 am

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What strikes me most about SCAMP's bow is how fine an entry it has at water level. It actually incorporates a pointy bow just under the pram bow. It's that pointy part that does most of the work of parting the water for the rest of the boat. The pram bow part rides high and serves to provide a tremendous amount of reserve buoyancy when it is needed. So the bow is actually a very clever hybrid pram bow – displaying a very fine entry in light air and possessing great reserve buoyancy when needed in the rough stuff. Everywhere you look on the SCAMP it becomes apparent that it's a very clever design – good work, Mr. Welsford!



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Sat Jun 23, 2012 6:34 am

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Yes the scamp is one beautifull small ship.
Peabody

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Mon Jun 25, 2012 4:20 am

 
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In many cases pram bowed boats are easier to build.
Another benefit.


Last edited by pocketyacht on Mon Jun 25, 2012 11:19 am, edited 1 time in total.


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Mon Jun 25, 2012 4:25 am

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Thought I'd toss these observations out for consideration.

What I write below is not a defense of the pram bow because in my mind the pram bow needs no defense. Not for everyone granted but for the sailor who is looking for function and form then SCAMPS bow delivers. What I care about when I sail is performance first and foremost and performance is not just speed it is load carrying ability, ease of handling on land and water, etc.

When sailing SCAMP one does not see the pram bow only the top at the forward edge of the foredeck. I have also not experienced SCAMP plowing or pushing water because she has a pointed bow where it counts (down low at and above the water line). On many points of sail when viewing SCAMP from another boat or from shore her pram bow is not apparent (when viewed from the side, from aft etc).

All in all SCAMPS pram bow offers uniqueness but not just for the sake of uniqueness, it's all business. If SCAMP had a pointed bow I think she would be just another boat that sails well and has other good qualities and I wouldn't be interested. I am not interested because of her pram bow but because it is only one element (and a critical one) that makes her a good boat.

The pram bow offers volume and what I want in at least one of my quiver of boats is "very small" but not so small as to be cramped and unable to carry a load. Small for at least one of my boats allows me to go out in minutes and man handle my boat on the water, near and onto shorelines, critical stuff for the sailor who wishes to sail very small. Very small usually means fine ends, lack of load carrying ability, etc. SCAMP has solved these issues.

The sum of all parts is what I look for in any boat design and JW approached the SCAMP design criteria and in my mind surpassed it with an innovative package of linked elements.

Pram bows are not at the top of my favorite looks in boat design but in some boats that are to be used for the purposes I use them for (off the beach micro boat coastal cruising) the pram bow is a good answer. When I experience a solid form/function mix in any design I fall for the looks and for me SCAMP is drop dead good looking.

If SCAMP does not grab a sailor by the heart then she is perhaps not for him/her (the boats we tend to use are maintain are boats that grab us). There is a world of small boats available without pram bows. The pram bow averse sailor might want to get into a boat with a pointy bow but before they do they should ask themselves a series of questions that begin with............what do I want to do with my boat?
Do you want to stand and admire her sweet fine lines or do you want a working boat that gets the day sailing and micro cruising done? Pointed bow boats will do the beach cruising thing but the shorter they get the less effective they are. I want small so I am able to handle my boat on the water on land and solo in a blow.

Try to notch a SCAMP ride for a demo sail. Give SCAMPs helm a chance and you might find her pram bow becomes endearing, she sails like a much bigger boat. She is the largest and by far the most comfortable under 12 foot boat that I have sailed.

My Mirror (the African Queen) has been a fantastic micro cruiser but soon she will be moved on to another sailor because SCAMP does what she does only better. I am all about form/function in small boats. Hard to argue with some 80,000 Mirror sailors.
howard


Last edited by pocketyacht on Mon Jun 25, 2012 5:54 pm, edited 2 times in total.


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Mon Jun 25, 2012 5:09 am

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She is ......( honestly ) the most beautiful boat I've ever seen..
Yes ' she grabs my heart strings ......


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