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Fri Nov 12, 2010 6:31 pm

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I'll be in Port Townsend right after Thanksgiving. Hope to see "The Scamp"!

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Sat Nov 13, 2010 1:22 pm

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A few people have wondered about SCAMP's stowage cabin and so-called veranda. We see several good reasons for such an arrangement. The idea was pretty simple: we wanted a cabin for all of the reasons one might want a cabin—except for sleeping inside.

Trying to put an enclosed berth in an 11' 11" boat just doesn't make a lot of sense. But we still wanted something to act as a bulwark against wind and spray; We still wanted the substantial additional flotation afforded by an enclosed (and in SCAMP's case, completely sealed) cabin, and we wanted the additional dry stowage for cruising. We get all of those things with the stowage cabin. And by extending the cabin roof aft, we get something approximating a hard dodger—shielding some of the cockpit and providing a refuge where one can duck out of the weather (or sun) for a few minutes. Spouses and children are more likely to come along knowing they can be sheltered and comfortable on a long beat to weather. And finally, the veranda provides a good starting point for a really exceptional boom tent over the rest of the cockpit for those who'll sleep aboard—either on the 8' 3" x 24" cockpit sole berth, or on the double berth made from 6'6" cockpit seats with filler boards.

Several people have also asked about our choice of a pram bow. It’s something I’d always seen for SCAMP. We actually forgot to mention it specifically in our first list of ideas for John Welsford, but in his initial response he actually suggested one. Craig had some initial reservations about its foreshortened appearance, but even he agreed the advantages it brings in terms of volume and buoyancy are much too great to ignore. We’ve noted that the majority of small-boat capsizes seem to occur off the wind in the form of a broach. All of the volume forward should make SCAMP more broach resistant. And as John put it, a pram bow is not just a change to the bow, it means the hull is much more full right through to the stern so, although small, the boat has considerably more volume than would otherwise be the case, she can carry bigger loads, and is more stable. All positive features in a little boat that will be used for both daysailing with the family and cruising with stores and equipment for a week or more.

For those who’ve suggested a pram bow might not do well in chop—please advise the San Francisco Bay Pelican people. And maybe the Pelican sailors can let the Mirror Dinghy folks know ;-) We feel SCAMP's relatively narrow pram bow achieves the desirable objectives without exaggerating appreciably the boat's chance of slamming or being slowed by chop.

Our final decision on overall length actually was not influenced by any registration or local length requirement, we just wanted the biggest little boat possible, and nothing makes a boat bigger for its length than a pram bow. A properly shaped pointy bow boat would probably need to be significantly longer and heavier to match the stability—and she likely would have been less nimble.

Finally, we were thrilled with performance during sea trials—never once was SCAMP stopped or pushed off. She came through all tacks, jibed with equanimity, and had a steadiness that belied her overall size.—Josh

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Sat Nov 13, 2010 4:21 pm

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What worries me about this whole thing is, what are we going to read about after Scamp! This has been fun to follow.

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Sat Nov 13, 2010 6:43 pm

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zignman wrote:
What worries me about this whole thing is, what are we going to read about after Scamp!

i'm hoping for the first group of builders to post comments and share in the print mag. there are sure to be a few extended overnight trip reports this coming sailing season ... or earlier if SCAMP goes on a road trip to places south.

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Sun Nov 14, 2010 8:05 am

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Editors wrote:
We’ve noted that the majority of small-boat capsizes seem to occur off the wind in the form of a broach. All of the volume forward should make SCAMP more broach resistant. —Josh



I would like to see some capsize test with water ballast and with out, preferably on a fine calm day.

Regards
David



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Sun Nov 14, 2010 6:27 pm

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A tender??? A TENDER??!! It looks to me like Scamp is not ready to play second fiddle to anyone!! :-) Seriously, this is a great looking boat that looks like LOADS of fun! I am thoroughly impressed with the photos. Way to go!

Hey Dave......shhhhhhhhh Are you trying to get me in trouble???? :-)


Sean



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Tue Nov 16, 2010 6:43 pm

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SCAMP is an absolutely gorgeous little sailboat! Going by the few photo's you've posted. I trust there will be more in the next issue, at least I'm hoping so. Its gotta be a great feeling having helped create & design this boat, then watch it being built and then having it sail as well as you expected it too. Good for you all & nice work. I'll also look forward to
reading about all the "Scampventures" till I can build my own.
Thanks again for a terrific magazine.

Gregg



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Wed Nov 24, 2010 1:29 pm

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Hey, Josh, on your blustery day of sailing, did you fill the water ballast tank? If so, how did that work out?

What a beautiful little boat...well done, to all involved!



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Wed Nov 24, 2010 3:35 pm

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Yep, filled the tank for sure. The 173 pounds really made the boat feel solid. Our simple ballast tank system (open inspection port, open plug in bottom of boat, let water fill, top off, replace plug, close inspection port) performed great. I suppose the boat would have felt even more powerful with some gear in the below-cockpit sole stowage and seat lockers. The boat was essentially empty except for an anchor + rode and oars.

Thanks for the nice words.

—Josh

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Sun Nov 28, 2010 6:55 pm

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I would like to comment on the question above as to the effect on the sailing qualities when the sail is laying against the mast and boom on one tack and being away from them on the other. For a number of years I worked for Edey & Duff and built, sailed and sold Dovekie sailboats which, with it's sprit rig, has a similar situation. Over a period of 25 years that I have been associated with Dovekies and Dovekie owners no one has been able to ascertain a measureable difference from one tack over the other due to the sail laying against or away from the spars. Bill Haberer



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