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Fri Mar 20, 2015 3:16 am

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On the required equip list- For a sound signaling device, is a whistle suitable for a 16' craft.

Found it- Pea less whistle ok.


Last edited by JollyRoger on Thu Mar 26, 2015 1:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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Sun Mar 22, 2015 9:30 am

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What is the essential gear to meet requirements in Canada? A reference lists Canadian small boat emergency gear requirements to include:

-Radar reflector
-Reboarding ladder
-50 foot buoyant heaving line

R2AK lists a radar reflector as recommended but not required, and no mention of the other items.

The main issue is the radar reflector. Right now I do not have one. I use eyeballs and VHF to avoid big ships and don't plan to travel in fog. Are you OK with that, Race Boss?

Thanks - Rick



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Mon Mar 23, 2015 3:15 pm

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rgthom wrote:
The main issue is the radar reflector. Right now I do not have one. I use eyeballs and VHF to avoid big ships and don't plan to travel in fog. Are you OK with that, Race Boss?

Thanks - Rick



Rick, great question.

What we list - as mandatory - is straight up mandatory and we strongly suggest a radar reflector if you have the ability. With regards to the other stuff you listed, they are items considered conditional. Like the boarding ladder is only required if you are above a certain freeboard. Radar reflector has conditions too. And I don't know about the floatable line, we may have just missed that one. Bottom line is we want everyone to adhere to all safety requirements of both the US and Canadian rules for their specific boat and uses.

Thank you so much for bringing this up. It's often hard to discern what some of the governments and websites are saying and, of course, requirements change unpredictably. Below is a link to a good Canadian description of boating requirements, but I encourage everyone to explore the topic themselves and share their findings. I'll add this link to our website too.

And Rick, while I also rely heavily on my eyes and good VHF communication all it takes is one good rain squall in the wrong place or fog forming faster then you can get out of there and presto, there is the boat you missed. During those times it can really help boats with radar if you can produce a slightly stronger return then the sea state or rain clutter around you. That is where a reflector can pay its passage.

Canada Transport Safe Boating Rules
http://www.tc.gc.ca/media/documents/marinesafety/TP-511e.pdf

Race Boss



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Mon Mar 23, 2015 4:16 pm

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Thanks Race Boss. For boats coming from the US, this part says meeting US requirements is sufficient if staying less than 45 days:

All boaters (both residents and visitors) on Canadian waters should know
and obey the rules that apply in Canada. However, if you are a non-resident
of Canada and are operating a boat in Canadian waters, the exceptions
below apply to you.
Operator Competency
Operating your boat in Canada for less than 45 consecutive days
If you are a non-resident visiting Canada with your boat, you are not
required to carry proof of competency on board as long as your boat is
in Canada for less than 45 consecutive days.
Operating your boat in Canada for 45 consecutive days and more or
operating a boat licensed or registered in Canada
If you are operating your boat in Canada for 45 consecutive days and
more or operating a boat licensed or registered in Canada, you are required
to carry a proof of competency, either an operator card or similar proof of
competency issued by your home state or country.
REMEMBER: As a visitor, remember that you must keep proof of
residence on board with you at all times.
Safety Equipment Requirements
Boats licensed or registered in a country other than Canada
Foreign boats (those that are licensed or registered in a country other than
Canada) need to comply with the equipment requirements of the country in
which the boat is usually kept.
Boats licensed or registered in Canada
If you are a non-resident of Canada operating a boat that is licensed
or registered in Canada, the boat must meet Canadian safety equipment
requirements. However, in either case, you may bring your own lifejacket
or PFD to use as long as it fits and meets the requirements of your
home country.



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Wed Mar 25, 2015 9:45 pm

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Hey Rick,

Can you post where that 45 day rule came from? You called it a "part", which always makes me think of the CFR's. I'd love to look at the source material. And thanks for finding and posting. I love this collaborative work!

Race Boss.



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Thu Mar 26, 2015 7:22 am

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It's from the link in your earlier post, the Canadian Safe Boating Guide, but ya gotta go all the way down to page 57 to see it.



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Fri Mar 27, 2015 6:29 pm

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Jolly Roger - I just reread your equipment list and noticed that you are only have one anchor listed with chain and rode, seems like redundancey would be prudent.

John S.



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Sat Mar 28, 2015 8:18 am

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John, You are right. I have lost anchors before so that may be a good idea. I am currently 21 lbs under my max useful load of 400 lbs of me and gear and even if it put me over might still be worth it. I am riding a fine line with my load and trying to reduce weigh where I can without leaving something or not having enough of something. I keep hearing that saying- Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. Then I think of the calms or foul tides and think of pedaling a heavy load.
Also from my list I forgot some required equip for boats of my size (16' 6" Tri) which is a heaving line and throwable floatation which I now have thanks to reading the link supplied.
Roger



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Sat Mar 28, 2015 9:00 pm

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The higher up your radar reflector is the sooner ships using radar will see it. Radar works on the line of sight principle and is affected by the height of the reflector and the height of the radar signal transmitter. Here 's a useful link https://aceboater.com/en/radar-reflector-boat-placement



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Sat Mar 28, 2015 9:01 pm

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Non-governmental link for minimal requirements of equipment on Canadian vessels. https://aceboater.com/en/equipment-plea ... y-on-board



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